Carmel Music Society presents Philharmonia Baroque

On Sunday, November 5, 2017 at 3 pm in Carmel’s Sunset Center, the Carmel Music Society presented a return engagement by Philharmonia Baroque. This is the fourth time the San Francisco Bay Area-based Philharmonia Baroque Orchestra has appeared on a Carmel Music Society concert season, and although the personnel may change from concert to concert, concertmaster Elizabeth Blumenstock has remained a constant. The concert line-up for the first half included works by baroque composers Locatelli, Pisendel, Veracini, and Vivaldi, however, it was announced before the concert began that the Vivaldi work to be included would not be the “Autumn” movement from the Seasons, but the Double Oboe Concerto in D Minor instead, due to Blumenstock feeling cramps in her arm the day before. We were assured that she was fully up to the rest of the concert, but to prevent further injury, just not up to the extreme taxing of “Autumn.” And by a few movements in, we forgot about being concerned for her as she simply played consistently and beautifully.

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Archived in these categories: Baroque, Carmel Music Society, Concerto, Orchestral


David Hatt in Organ Recital at St Dunstans Church October 27, 2017

David Hatt presented an organ recital on October 27 at St Dunstans  Church This was such an interesting and very musical concert, with the organ starring, as it always does. It is a beautiful instrument both in sound and sight, and David Hatt masterfully presented so many of it’s colors. He played Baroque and modern pieces that evoked a great variety of dimensions in a presentation called “From Logic to Dreams.” In the logic part of the program we heard Buxtehude, J.S. Bach, and Max Reger, all played with splendid registrations. Read full story

Archived in these categories: 20th Century, Baroque, Organ


Santa Cruz Symphony — Music of the Spheres

Concert Master Nigel Armstrong

 The Santa Cruz Symphony under the direction of Maestro Danny Stewart opened its 60th season with its new orchestral members included in a most impressive performance of Vivaldi’s “The Four Seasons” (ca. 1725) and Gustav Holst’s “The Planets” (1916). To sum up this concert in one word would be quite impossible, however, I believe “brilliant” would lead one in the correct direction! The addition of new musicians has already paid huge dividends in raising the performance bar and only furthers the fact the orchestra’s reputation under Stewart has spread like wildfire. Read full story

Archived in these categories: 20th Century, Baroque, Santa Cruz Symphony


CBF Chamber Concert – Bach Cantatas

 

  Gonzalo X. Ruiz, Marika Holmqvist, Margaret Jordan-Gay, Patricia Ahern, Karina Schmitz, Dongsok Shin

On Monday July 24, 2017 2:30 pm, at All Saints Church in Carmel, we heard the Carmel Bach Festival Chamber Concert, “Bach Cantatas.” This beautifully programmed concert opened with J.S. Bach’s entire sacred cantata BWV 199, Mein Herze schwimmt in Blut, scored for soprano solo, strings, continuo, and oboe, while the second part of the program consisted of tenor solo arias, and tenor and soprano duet selections from Cantatas 5, 110, 85, 43, and 145. Soprano Mhairi Lawson and tenor Tomas Cooley, formidable soloists in their own right, were a matched duet pair, happy and comfortable together, their duet sound was smiling and sparkling. The instrumental ensemble was in top form: Gonzalo X. Ruiz, oboe; Patricia Ahern, Marika Holmqvist, violin; Karina Schmitz, viola; Margaret Jordan-Gay, cello; Dongsok Shin, harpsichord. Read full story

Archived in these categories: All Saints' Church, Baroque, Carmel Bach Festival, Choral


CBF Chamber Concert: “Le Mozart Noir” in Paris

Portrait c. 1787 of composer Joseph Bologne, Chevalier de Saint-Georges (1745-1799), dubbed “Le Mozart Noir”

On July 21 the Carmel Bach Festival Chamber Concert, Mozart in Paris at 2:30 pm at All Saints Church, introduced many of us to an intriguing classical composer about whom we had never heard, known as Le Mozart Noir. From the program notes written by Allan Whear, found on page 170 of the 2017 CBF program book, “Saint-Georges is without a doubt one of the most fascinating characters in music history, worthy of a romantic novel or Hollywood screenplay. Born on the Caribbean Island of Guadeloupe, he was the son of a Senegalese slave [Nanon], and a French plantation owner. His father, *George Bologne de Saint-Georges, became wealthy raising sugar cane in the New World, and returned to Paris [with his son and Nanon] to become a minor aristocrat.” Saint-Georges was brought up as a gentleman in Paris and received musical training in violin and composition.As a young man, he led orchestras, published a body of instrumental and vocal works, and premiered his own compositions while becoming quite well-known in musical and aristocratic circles. “He also excelled at fencing, becoming known as the finest swordsman in France.” The most famous image of Saint-Georges is a dashing portrait of the composer portrayed with a sword, painted in 1787 by Mather Brown. Read full story

Archived in these categories: Baroque, Chamber music, Classical Era