Carmel Bach Festival presents: An Evening with Edwin Huizinga

 Huizinga

Ian Scarfe, Edwin Huizinga & William Coulter

This week the Carmel Bach Festival presented an evening with Edwin Huizinga (and friends) which brought to fruition a longtime dream of expanding the festival outside the annual Bach Festival July season and outside the Carmel area. The concert featured Edwin Huizinga, one of the Bach Festival’s most versatile violinists. He was joined by Ian Scarfe on piano and William Coulter on guitar. The February 12th, 2015 concert was so popular that it sold out quickly and a second performance was added which also sold out. The concert featured a variety of music from Baroque to Celtic and kept concert-goers engaged with both familiar favorites and unexpected surprises.

The warm acoustics of St. Dunstan’s Episcopal Church worked well with the high-energy performance of the first movement of the unaccompanied J.S. Bach Partita No. 3 in E Major opening the concert while showing off Huizinga’s dynamic control. This was the first concert at St. Dunstan’s in Bach Festival history but it will become a frequent venue in the future as the church has commissioned an 1100 pipe tracker organ to be built by Dobson Pipe Organ Builders in Lake City, Iowa later this year. After the Bach Partita the performers departed from the printed program by offering next a well-balanced collaboration between Huizinga and pianist Ian Scarpe for the 1st movement of the G Major Violin Sonata by Brahms. This piece really showed off the violinist’s warm luscious tone, while Scarpe coaxed flowing ripples of music from the piano. Linking this concert to the upcoming Bach Festival season entitled “Bach, Bohemia and Beyond” was a thrilling performance of Tzigane (“the Gypsy”) by Maurice Ravel in which the duo shared the spotlight as the piano accompaniment (originally written for harp) is an equal voice with the violin. Composer John Adams, who won a Grammy Award earlier this week for his “City Noir” recording, was featured in Relaxed Groove from “Road Movies for Violin and Piano” after Scarpe gave the audience a short description of the use of patterns and repetition in minimalist music styles. The audience was enthralled with the well-loved Meditation from the opera Thaïs, exquisitely played by Huizinga.

The remainder of the concert featured the violinist with the able accompaniment of William Coulter on guitar. Although the melody of the J.S. Bach Cello Suite No. 1 played on violin was familiar, the guitar accompaniment with alternative harmony and rhythmic energy had the audience literally dancing in their seats and was teasingly described by the performers as “not your mother’s Bach”. The rousing medley of traditional Celtic songs Quarter Inch Wick, Don Oiche Ud I Mbeithil (That Night in Bethlehem) and Cregg’s Pipes kept the audience tapping before the concert closed with two movements of Winter from Vivaldi’s Four Seasons. The encore allowed Huizinga, Scarpe and Coulter to play together on Astor Piazzola’s Oblivion, leaving the audience thrilled with this evening’s concert and looking forward to seeing more of the Bach Festival when it returns to Carmel in July.

This week the Carmel Bach Festival presented an evening with Edwin Huizinga (and friends) which brought to fruition a longtime dream of expanding the festival outside the annual Bach Festival July season and outside the Carmel area. The concert featured Edwin Huizinga, one of the Bach Festival’s most versatile violinists. He was joined by Ian Scarfe on piano and William Coulter on guitar. The February 12th, 2015 concert was so popular that it sold out quickly and a second performance was added which also sold out. The concert featured a variety of music from Baroque to Celtic and kept concert-goers engaged with both familiar favorites and unexpected surprises.

The warm acoustics of St. Dunstan’s Episcopal Church worked well with the high-energy performance of the first movement of the unaccompanied J.S. Bach Partita No. 3 in E Major opening the concert while showing off Huizinga’s dynamic control. This was the first concert at St. Dunstan’s in Bach Festival history but it will become a frequent venue in the future as the church has commissioned an 1100 pipe tracker organ to be built by Dobson Pipe Organ Builders in Lake City, Iowa later this year. After the Bach Partita the performers departed from the printed program by offering next a well-balanced collaboration between Huizinga and pianist Ian Scarpe for the 1st movement of the G Major Violin Sonata by Brahms. This piece really showed off the violinist’s warm luscious tone, while Scarpe coaxed flowing ripples of music from the piano. Linking this concert to the upcoming Bach Festival season entitled “Bach, Bohemia and Beyond” was a thrilling performance of Tzigane (“the Gypsy”) by Maurice Ravel in which the duo shared the spotlight as the piano accompaniment (originally written for harp) is an equal voice with the violin. Composer John Adams, who won a Grammy Award earlier this week for his “City Noir” recording, was featured in Relaxed Groove from “Road Movies for Violin and Piano” after Scarpe gave the audience a short description of the use of patterns and repetition in minimalist music styles. The audience was enthralled with the well-loved Meditation from the opera Thaïs, exquisitely played by Huizinga.

The remainder of the concert featured the violinist with the able accompaniment of William Coulter on guitar. Although the melody of the J.S. Bach Cello Suite No. 1 played on violin was familiar, the guitar accompaniment with alternative harmony and rhythmic energy had the audience literally dancing in their seats and was teasingly described by the performers as “not your mother’s Bach”. The rousing medley of traditional Celtic songs Quarter Inch Wick, Don Oiche Ud I Mbeithil (That Night in Bethlehem) and Cregg’s Pipes kept the audience tapping before the concert closed with two movements of Winter from Vivaldi’s Four Seasons. The encore allowed Huizinga, Scarpe and Coulter to play together on Astor Piazzola’s Oblivion, leaving the audience thrilled with this evening’s concert and looking forward to seeing more of the Bach Festival when it returns to Carmel in July.

End

Archived in these categories: Baroque, Carmel Bach Festival, Chamber music, Classical Era, Piano, Romantic Era.
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